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Category Archives: Study Tips

Free English Lesson – Describing the human body

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Welcome to another free English lesson from Maltalingua. Today you will be focusing on the human body.

Knowing the parts of the body is very important in any language. If you go to a gym, the instructor might ask you about your body and how to check parts of it. If you go to a doctor or a physician, he might ask you what problems you have with your body and which part of your body is in pain. Today we’re going to look at the English names for different parts of the body and how to remember them.

This lesson is aimed at students learning English at Pre-Intermediate level or above.

 

Many students have a problem with remembering most of the vocabulary that they’ve learned in the same lesson. How can you remember all of these words? Here are a few suggestions:

 

  • Remember body parts using the different parts of the body

Head: cheeks, chin, ear, eye, face, head, neck, nose
Shoulders to stomach: arm, chest, finger, hand, shoulder, stomach, wrist
Waist to feet: ankle, foot, hip, knee, leg, toe, waist
Just as we did in the video, use different colours to write and memorise these. Using flashcards can also be helpful!

 

  • Use pronunciation to help you remember words with the sound

/ e / chest, head, leg, neck
/ ɪ / chin, fingers, hips, wrist
/ əʊ / nose, shoulders, toes
/ iː / cheeks, knee

Don’t forget that words like wrist and knee have silent letters. Words like stomach are more difficult to pronounce so focus on them. Pay attention to vowel sounds, these can be helpful too!

 

  • Revise, revise, revise

Keep in mind that it’s not enough to just make these lists. Many times, we see students take their lists and put them into their bags, never to be seen again! Remember to take out these lists and revise them regularly. It only takes two minutes to go through a list again and say the words out loud, but repetition is vital when you are memorising vocabulary.

Now that you have a better understanding of the human body, make a list and show it to us in the comment section below! Make sure to check out our video for a fuller explanation, given by our CELTA-qualified teachers.

Discover more of Maltalingua’s free English lessons. Explore more about imperatives here.

Check out our other brilliant free English lessons here.

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Free English Lesson – Imperatives and how to use them!

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Welcome to a free English lesson from Maltalingua. Today you will be focusing on the Imperatives.

A simple idea with so many different uses – You have probably used or heard imperatives before, in your language or in English. If you’ve been to an English school, like Maltalingua, your teacher probably used them many times: “Open your book”, “Go to page 6” and so on. We can use imperatives to give orders, but not only – find out more in this free English lesson on imperatives and how to use them!

This lesson is aimed at students learning English at Pre-Intermediate level or above.

Imperatives have a very simple form. All you need to do is to take any verb in English that you want to use as an imperative and remove ‘to’. For example, if you want someone to open their book or to listen to you:

  • To open —> “Open your book.”
  • To listen —> “Listen to me.”

If you want to form a negative imperative (something you don’t want someone to do) simply add ‘don’t’ before the verb. For example, if you want someone not to speak or not to shout:

  • To (not) speak —> “Don’t speak, I’m talking to you.”
  • To (not shout —> “Don’t shout, the baby’s asleep.”

We can use imperatives for many different things, not only for orders. We can use them to do the following:

  • To give directions: Turn left, Take the second right. / Cross the road.
  • To give advice/suggestions: Don’t watch that movie. / Take an umbrella with you, it’s raining!
  • To ask someone to do something: Come in, sit down. / Listen to this.
  • To wish someone something: Have a lovely day. / Enjoy your holiday.
  • To make offers: Make yourself at home. / Have some juice (or some cake).

Discover more of Maltalingua’s free English lessons. Explore more about -ed endings here.

Check out our other brilliant free English lessons here.

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Free English Lesson – Exploring the future continuous!

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Welcome to a free English lesson from Maltalingua. Today you will be focusing on the Future Continuous.

How often do you hear native speakers talking about the future and you aren’t quite sure what form they’re using, and why? In English, the future is a problematic area because as opposed to the past and the present, there is no future ‘tense’. However, there are several forms that are used to refer to the future. These forms have different functions and talk about the future with different levels of certainty.

This lesson is aimed at students learning English at Upper-Intermediate level or above.

One form that is often used amongst native speakers is the Future Continuous form. Have a look at how the future continuous form is used:

  1. “I can’t make it tonight… I’ll probably be studying all evening.”
  2. “So you won’t be coming to the party tomorrow, will you?”
  3. “The party will be starting at 9, in case you change your mind.”
  4. “Will I be seeing you this Saturday for lunch?”
  5. “I’ll be taking my exam in the morning.”

The form has 2 main uses. Firstly, like other continuous forms, it shows the progression of an action at a certain time/period in the future. In sentences 1 and 5 for example, the actions of studying/taking the exams will happen during or throughout the time period mentioned.

Secondly, the future continuous can simply refer to a planned action at a time in the future. In sentences 2 and 4 the speaker says this with the knowledge that a plan was made from beforehand i.e there were plans to go to the party and to meet for lunch.

Forming the future continuous form can’t be easier. As you can see above, you need the subject, the auxiliary verb ‘will be’ and a verb in the –ing form (1, 3, 5). For the negative, change ‘will’ to ‘won’t’ (2) and for the question simply to invert the subject and ‘will’ (4).

Furthermore, you might also have heard native speakers change the auxiliary ‘will’ to ‘going to’ or ‘should’, both of which have similar functions. For example:

  • I’m gonna be taking my exam in the morning on Saturday. (the spoken form of ‘going to’)
  • I should be studying all evening. (here, perhaps implying a form of obligation)

Finally, you can often switch the future continuous with other forms used in English for the future, for example:

  • I’m going to study all evening. (be going to for intentions)
  • The party starts at 9. (present simple for schedules)
  • I’m taking my exam on Saturday morning. (present continuous for fixed plans)

Now that you have a better understanding of the future continuous form, try using it to talk about your plans or things you’ll be doing tonight! Make sure to check out our video for a fuller explanation, given by our CELTA-qualified teacher.

Discover more of Maltalingua’s free English lessons. Explore more about -ed endings here.

Check out our other brilliant free English lessons here.

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Tips to help you with “-ed” endings.

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Did you know that the way you write “walked” is probably not the way you say it? Pronunciation is an essential part of learning a foreign language, and sometimes communication can break down because of simple and easy to avoid mistakes. Pronouncing “-ed” at the end of verbs in English can be challenging, because there are THREE ways of saying it. Discover more about them below.  

This lesson is for students learning English at Pre-Intermediate level or for people who have a general interest in phonemic sounds.  

ED endings appear at the end of regular verbs in the past tensee.g. wanted, helped, lived.

Sometimes in adjectives ending in ED, such as tired, embarrassed, relaxed, and also in some Past Participles. These ED ending words can cause some problems for non-native speakers because there are three possible ways of pronouncing them:  / ɪd /, / t / or / d /

  Don’t worry there are a few rules that can help you remember which pronunciation we need for each word, but first we need to recognise our voiced and voiceless consonants.

Put your finger on your throat and pronounce the letter L.

Now do the same thing but pronounce the P.

Notice the difference? The ‘L’ sound causes a vibration in your throat but the ‘P’ sound doesn’t. If it makes a vibration then it is a voiced sound (consonant) if it doesn’t, then it is a voiceless sound (consonant). Try this with the other letters and you will “feel” the difference between a voiced and a voiceless consonant (or sound).

Now we know the difference between voiced and voiceless sounds we can look at the following rules for the correct pronunciation of ED in English:

The /ɪd/ sound The /t/ sound The /d/ sound
If the last letter of the word is a ‘d’ or ‘t’, the ED pronunciation is an /ɪd/ sound

 

It rhymes with kidand bid.

 

Wanted is pronounced as “want-id”,

More examples.. 

waited (“wait-id”)

needed (“need-id”)

folded (“fold-id”)

If the last consonant of the word is voiceless ‘k’ ‘s’ ‘p’ then the ED pronunciation is as a T.

 

Be careful not to create an extra syllable or “id” sound.

 

talked (sounds like “talkt”)

parked (“parkt”)

helped (“helpt”)

If the last letter of the word ends in a voicedsound (consonant) ‘m’ ‘l’ ‘n’, then the ED is pronounced like a D

 

(without creating another syllable)

played (sounds like “playd”)

closed (the S sounds like a vibrating Z so the word would sound like “clozd”)

opened (“opend”)

lived (“livd”)

Now you’ve learnt the THREE ways of pronouncing “-ed” in English, well done! Make sure to check out our video for a more detailed look, given by our CELTA-qualified EFL teacher.

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Free Online English Lesson – Wishes, Dreams, Desires & Ambitions

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Our dreams and ambitions follow us everywhere. It’s so important to be able to talk about them and to express ourselves in English. In conversations and other situations where you need to give reliable, fluent answers in English, these functional-language phrases will help you to keep the words flowing in a natural way.

Learn phrases used by native English speakers and memorize them to use in your next English conversation. These phrases might be challenging to translate from English to your language. We recommend leaving the translator alone and engaging in our English expressions lesson.

See how these English phrases can be used in such an easy and natural way to make you sound like you’ve been using these expressions all your life! Our native English teacher Brian Dimech will show you examples of real-life situations where you can use these English phrases in an everyday conversation.

Furthermore, our English phrases are ready-to-go functional-language, which means they need minimal changes to grammar or sentence-structure to use when you’re engaging in an English-speaking situation.

This video is perfect for English language students at the CEFR level B1+ (Intermediate) and level B2 (Upper Intermediate).

REMEMBER TO…

It’s OK to watch this video without writing down every word, but remember to come back and write down all the phrases that Brian teaches you. It always helps to write things down if you want to remember them!

IT’S EASY!

We’ve summarised all the phrases towards the beginning and the end of the video, go and see Brian’s goodbye to find all the phrases. Scroll back to after Brian’s introduction to check the correct form for these great English phrases to express your wishes and ambitions!

ALWAYS PLAY

English is a flexible and fun language. Now that you’ve learned the basic situations to use your new English phrases, make sure you change the verbs (see the correct forms in the video!) and find ways of applying them to a variety of different situations! Just make sure that your phrasal structure follows ours!

LISTEN FOR…

The English expressions being taught in these videos are used every day, all over the world. Now that you’ve learned them, you’ll be surprised to know that you’re going to be noticing other people using them a lot. Make sure to join in and use the phrases that you put so much time into learning and remembering.

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Online Video Lessons #9 – Grammar and Vocabulary

Prepositions of place English lesson
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Jonathan and Danielle worked hard last week to bring you 5 more great Maltalingua lesson videos. This week we have a mix of grammar and vocabulary. The lessons are about prepositions, prefixes, ‘have’/’have got’, ‘few’/’little’ and advanced phrases for ‘too much’.

You can always find many more lesson videos on our YouTube channel. Remember to like share and subscribe!

Elementary: Prepositions of Place – English Grammar Lesson

Elementary English lesson videos on YouTube.

 

Pre-Intermediate: ‘Have’ vs ‘Have Got’ – English Grammar Lesson

Pre-Intermediate English lesson videos.

 

Intermediate: Little/Few – English Grammar Lesson

We have lots more Intermediate level videos on YouTube.

 

Upper-Intermediate: Prefixes – English Vocabulary Lesson

Check out our Upper Intermediate level playlist.

 

Advanced: Phrases to Describe ‘Too Much’ – English Vocabulary Explanation

Find all out out Advanced level lesson videos here

We love comments! If you’ve got any questions or if you just want to say ‘hi’, leave a comment below.

 

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Online Video Lessons #8 – Adjectives, punctuation and more

maltalingua teachers saying thank you to people who have watched the vidoes
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Last week our YouTube channel reached 150 subscribers so Danielle and Jonathan wanted to say a big THANK YOU to everyone who watched, liked, shared and subscribed!

 

Now, here are this week’s English lesson videos. We have three lessons about adjectives, one about punctuation and one about present perfect vs past simple.

Elementary: Adjectives to Describe Food – English Vocabulary Explanation

More elementary lesson videos.

 

Pre-Intermediate: Describing Weather – English Vocabulary Lesson

Watch all our Pre-Intermediate English lesson videos here.

 

Intermediate: Present Perfect vs Past Simple – English Grammar Lesson

You can find all of our Intermediate level English video tutorials in this playlist.

 

Upper-Intermediate: Punctuation Revision – English Grammar Lesson

Go to our YouTube channel to watch all our our Upper Intermediate level English tutorials.

 

Advanced: Confused Adjectives – English Vocabulary Explanation

Check out our playlist of advanced level English lesson videos.

Have you got any questions or feedback for us? Leave a comment below! We love it when people leave comments!

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Online Video Lessons #7 – Greetings, articles, magic and more

online English lessons with CELTA qualified teachers.
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Hello everyone! We have 5 great new videos this week including differences between UK and US English, and a lesson with a professional magician! You can also learn how to use English grammar articles, greet people and write formally and informally.

We love it when people like, share videos, and subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/maltalingua

Elementary: Greetings – English Functional Language Explanation

Watch all our elementary videos.

 

Pre-Intermediate: Greetings – English Functional Language Explanation

We have a lot more Pre-Intermediate level videos. You can watch them here.

 

Intermediate: Magic with Eddy – English Vocabulary Lesson

Do you want to watch more intermediate level videos? Then go to our playlist.

 

Upper-Intermediate: US vs UK – English Vocabulary Lesson

Watch all of our Upper Intermediate videos on YouTube.

 

Advanced: Writing Styles – English Vocabulary Explanation

We have a collection of advanced level videos that you can find in our playlist.

Have you got any questions or feedback for us? Leave a comment below!

 

 

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Online Video Lessons #6 – Grammar, Vocabulary and Romance!

CELTA qualified teacher explaining 'this', 'that', 'these' and 'those'.
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This week we have another 5 brand new English video lessons. As usual we have one for each of the 5 main English language levels.

If you like, share and subscribe on YouTube, you’ll make us very happy!

You can visit our channel here: https://www.youtube.com/c/maltalingua

Elementary: ‘This’, ‘That’, ‘These’ and ‘Those’ – English Grammar Lesson

More elementary videos.

 

Pre-Intermediate: Adjectives ‘ed’ & ‘ing’ – English Vocabulary Lesson

See all of our Pre-Intermediate level videos..

 

Intermediate: Present Perfect for Past Experience – English Grammar Lesson

Check out our Intermediate lesson playlist!

 

Upper-Intermediate: Improving Vocabulary – English lesson

We have loads more Upper-Intermediate level videos. Watch them here.

 

Advanced: Describing a Date – English Functional Language Lesson

If you want to watch more of our advanced level videos, click here.

Leave a comment. Ask us questions, tell us your opinion or just say ‘hi’!

 

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Online English Lesson Videos #5 – I Can Give Directions!

English video lesson about directions.
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Watch our 5 newest video lessons. There’s one for students at each English level.

To watch more English lesson go to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/maltalingua
Remember to like, share and subscribe!

Elementary: ‘Can’ Ability – English Grammar Lesson

Watch all of our Elementary level videos.

 

Pre-Intermediate: Directions – English Functional Language Lesson

More Pre-Intermediate level videos.

 

Intermediate: Present Continuous for Future – English Grammar Lesson

You can watch more of our Intermediate level videos here.

 

Upper-Intermediate: ‘Would’ Past Habits – English Grammar Lesson

Click here to see all of our Upper-Intermediate level videos.

 

Advanced: Common Collocations – English Vocabulary Lesson

We have a wide range of Advanced level videos. You can watch them here.

We love it when people leave comments! And we’re very happy to answer questions about the English language.

 

 

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